Health Insurance Company Irving

 

 

Health Insurance Company Irving

Teenage Depression

Through my wife, a cognitive psychologist specializing in applying cognitive theory to family dynamics and, in particular, teenage depression, I have learned that in recent years Health Insurance Company Irving has become increasingly prevalent. Today 37 percent of adolescents are at least mildly depressed; suicide is second only to accidents in teenage death rates; and depression and suicide are equally prevalent across all socioeconomic groups. Recent theoretical explanations of the causes of Health Insurance Company Irving have focused on the imbalance between demands and resources facing teenagers.

Children entering their teenage years face many very real demands. Socially, they need to learn to mix with others outside the family. Physically, they must learn to deal with hormonal and other maturation changes. Cognitively, they must face academic and career expectations. These demands possess a number of comparable characteristics. First, they are inevitable. They affect every adolescent regardless of social status; avoiding or hiding from them is impossible. Second, they are real; they cannot be denied or discounted. Third, these demands are cognitive; adolescents perceive that they are linked to their own and others’ expectations for their futures.

Demands may seem to cause depression, but they do not. Health Insurance Company Irving does not result from high demands, but from demands that exceed resources. Resources represent the energy-providing activities that help individuals cope with demands. At its simplest level, when teenagers feel “they just can’t cope with it all,” it is not the demand alone, but the inability to cope that causes Health Insurance Company Irving. A number of resources increase the possibility of coping with high demands, including having friends among peers, among adults, and within the family; developing healthy habits in nutrition, exercise, sleep, and so on, that provide physical stamina and endurance; learning academic skills and abstract reasoning; learning to manage time and personal space; acquiring maturity in making decisions for the longer term; and developing a personal statement of morality, having faith in a higher order.

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